John Buccelli - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Verani Realty Somerville



Posted by John Buccelli on 4/3/2018


8 Conwell St, Somerville, MA 02143

Condo

$569,000
Price

4
Rooms
2
Beds
1
Baths
Charming 1st floor condo with old world charm! This renovated home features 2 bedrooms, eat in kitchen with a nook, plenty of cabinets and dining room. Forced hot air heating system, circuit breakers, nice yard with patio. There are some new replacement windows. Excellent location, walk to Davis Square/Bike Path, Porter Sq, Ball Square and Tufts. New stainless-steel appliances!
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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Tags: Somerville   Real Estate   Condo   02143  
Categories: New Homes  


Posted by John Buccelli on 3/25/2018

As a first-time home seller, you may feel the need to make a counter-offer based on a homebuyer's initial proposal. However, if the homebuyer rejects your counter-offer, you may be forced to return to square one in your efforts to sell your house and obtain the best price for it.

A homebuyer's rejection of a counter-proposal is not the end of a home selling journey. And for home sellers who know how to proceed after a counter-proposal is rejected, they may be able to streamline the process of getting the optimal price for any residence, at any time.

Now, let's take a look at three tips that a first-time home seller can use to handle a rejected counter-proposal on his or her house.

1. Consider the Homebuyer's Perspective

Why did a homebuyer reject your counter-proposal? A first-time home seller should consider why a homebuyer decided to move on from a house after a counter-proposal was submitted and learn from the experience.

For example, if a home seller held firm on his or her home price, a homebuyer may have been unwilling to pay this amount. Thus, a home seller may want to consider lowering the price of his or her residence in to help stir up interest from large groups of potential homebuyers.

2. Review All of Your Options

A first-time home seller who submits a counter-proposal and receives a rejection from a homebuyer still has plenty of options, regardless of the current state of the housing market.

For instance, a home seller can keep the price of his or her house intact. Then, this home seller can await potential offers that match or exceed his or her expectations.

On the other hand, a home seller may choose to conduct assorted home improvements to upgrade his or her house's interior and exterior. These upgrades can make a world of difference in the eyes of homebuyers, and as a result, may make a home more attractive than other residences that are currently available.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a difference-maker for a first-time home seller, and for good reason. This housing market professional can offer expert guidance that a home seller may struggle to obtain elsewhere and ensure that a property seller can make informed decisions at each stage of the home selling journey.

With a real estate agent at your side, you can map out your next steps in the home selling journey accordingly.

Typically, a real estate agent will be able to tell you why a homebuyer rejected a counter-proposal on your residence. As such, you can learn from the experience and gain the insights you need to prevent the same problem from happening once again.

Selling a home can be difficult, particularly for those who have listed a residence for the first time. A real estate agent will help you take the guesswork out of selling your residence and do everything possible to ensure you can get the best possible price for your house.

Ready to overcome a rejected counter-proposal on your home? Use these tips, and you can proceed with confidence along the home selling journey.





Posted by John Buccelli on 3/18/2018

Many home buyers approach house hunting from the same angle as an employer searching for the ideal job candidate. It's almost like they have a split personality. On one hand, they're hoping that each prospect will be the one they ultimately choose. On the other hand, they're also looking for flaws and weaknesses -- reasons not to choose the house (or the job candidate) they're considering.

The solution to that dilemma for home sellers is simple... but not necessarily easy! Follow the advice of songwriter Johnny Mercer, who penned the lyrics to the 1944 hit song "Accentuate the Positive" (eliminate the negative)! Presenting your home in its best light to potential buyers not only helps attract more offers, but it also increases your chances of receiving your asking price -- assuming it's based on hard facts, such as recent sales data of other comparable homes in the neighborhood.

Getting It Right The First Time

An experienced real estate agent can be immensely helpful in determining a realistic listing price that will reflect your home's fair market value without being too high. (The last thing you want is for the price to scare away qualified prospects!) Although it's not an exact science, there is a methodology that helps make sure the listing price is reasonable and in the right ball park.

There are several challenges that homeowners face in staging their home for quick sale and determining the best price for all parties involved. In addition to the potential pitfall of allowing one's emotions to inflate a home's asking price, it's also difficult for the owner to view their home through the eyes of potential buyers. That's why professional advice can often make the difference between success and failure in real estate sales.

Being able to identify cost-effective ways to enhance the curb appeal and overall marketability of a house for sale can be difficult for someone who doesn't do it on a daily basis. A real estate professional with a trained eye can zero in on necessary changes, repairs, and cosmetic improvements that can accentuate the positive and eliminate -- or at least, downplay -- the negative!

If it's been a few years since your house or rooms have received a fresh coat of paint, then that might be one of the first improvements a real estate agent or home staging consultant recommends. To "cast as wide of a net" as possible, neutral paint colors typically have the broadest appeal to prospective home buyers. Fresh flowers -- both in hanging baskets and vases -- are an inexpensive way to add some color and appealing touches to the look and feel of your home. Doing your best to get rid of clutter, weeds, and objectionable odors in and around your home are other basic steps you can take to make a positive impression on potential buyers.





Posted by John Buccelli on 3/11/2018

If you recently bought or sold a house, you may have only a short amount of time to pack up your belongings and get your family ready for moving day. As such, you'll need to tell your children about your upcoming move to ensure they can prepare accordingly.

Ultimately, informing your kids about your move can be difficult, especially for families that have lived in a particular city or town for many years. Lucky for you, we're here to help you minimize the stress commonly associated with telling your kids about moving day.

Here are three tips to ensure you can stay calm, cool and composed when you inform your kids about your decision to relocate.

1. Speak with Your Kids As Soon As Possible

The longer that you wait to tell your kids about your move, the tougher it will become to break the news to them. Thus, as soon as you decide to purchase or sell a home, you should tell your kids.

Remember, the sooner you speak with your children, the sooner they can start planning for the future. You also can discuss any moving concerns with your kids and ensure they can receive your full emotional support as moving day approaches.

2. Plan Ahead for Your Family Discussion

In most instances, kids will have lots of questions about your decision to move. As a parent, it is your responsibility to dedicate the necessary time and resources to respond to all of your kids' queries.

Consider your children's perspective before you inform your kids about your decision to buy or sell a house Ė you'll be glad you did. If you plan ahead for a discussion with your kids, you may be able to anticipate potential questions and be ready to provide thoughtful responses.

3. Be Honest

No parent has all the answers, all the time. And if you face children's questions about your move and are uncertain about how to respond to them, you should not hesitate to speak from the heart.

It may be impossible to have answers to all of your kids' questions about an upcoming move. However, if you're honest with your children, you can provide them with plenty of support throughout the moving cycle.

When it comes to discussing an upcoming move with kids, both parents and their children may get emotional. Fortunately, parents and children can work together to support one another and ensure all family members can reap the benefits of a successful transition to a new address.

Lastly, if you need extra help as you get ready to discuss an upcoming move with your kids, you can always consult with a real estate agent. In addition to helping you navigate the homebuying or home selling process, a real estate agent can provide honest, unbiased recommendations about the best ways to inform your children about your decision to buy or sell a residence.

Use the aforementioned tips, and you can take the guesswork out of telling your kids about your upcoming move.




Tags: moving tips   kids  
Categories: Moving Tips   kids   moving  


Posted by John Buccelli on 3/4/2018

Is it better to rent or buy? There is no simple answer to the question, yet itís something we all ask ourselves at some point in our adult lives.

When you ask yourself this question, youíre not just determining whether itís more affordable to buy or rent. Rather, youíre answering questions about what your life will look like in the coming years--in terms of both lifestyle and location.

In this article, weíre going to talk about the issue of buying vs renting. Weíll talk about ways you can educate yourself to make the most informed decision possible. After all, whether youíre buying a home or signing a lease, this is a decision that will affect a large amount of your time and dictate at least the next year of your life.

Outside influences

Before you start thinking about mortgages and leases, itís a good idea to get an idea of the market. Specifically, youíll want to look at the cost of living for the area you plan on moving to. It may seem like common sense that the cost of apartments and houses will rise and fall at the same rate, but evidence points to the contrary.

Elements that are out of your control could be things like:

  • Property tax amounts

  • Inflation and cost of living changes (gas, utilities, etc.)

  • Stock market variations, which affect your investments

  • Real estate market changes

  • Income changes (job change or loss)

As you can see already, these outside influences have the potential to make a huge impact on whether it makes more sense to rent or buy.

Letís say you decided to rent a home and put the money you would have used for a down payment into an investment fund. You have a good year and earn 5% on your investments. At the same time, the price of homes as gone down significantly in the area you hope to move.

As you can see, in this scenario it would probably make sense to pay rent for a year before buying a home.

Out-of-pocket expenses and equity

One of the biggest advantages of owning a home is that by definition, if you are making sufficient and timely mortgage payments, you are earning equity. Equity can be used later to make a down payment on a larger home, or for selling to use toward retirement funds later in life.

On the other hand, renting is an out-of-pocket cost that comes at a loss. Once you pay rent, there is no getting it back to use later on.

It may seem like buying is the obvious solution, then. However, there are also many out-of-pocket costs for owning a home. Property taxes, insurance, and interest paid to your lender are all things that you canít recuperate.

Finding out whether itís cheaper to buy or rent will come down to balancing those factors, and weighing them against the odds of the real estate market.







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